Cooking with (wood) gas: porridge

I’ve been trying to make my homemade woodgas stoves work with pellets.  I’m still figuring it out.  People like this guy are able to produce flames of 1500 degrees F with pellets in small can-built stoves.  My stoves haven’t been so carefully made, but they’ve performed well enough with sticks and chips and chunks.  Pellets, though: I keep having them go out less than halfway through.

This morning, since I don’t have to be at work until noon, I decided to try my little stove with another load of pellets to cook porridge, a favorite of mine for breakfast.

First, something about this porridge: I ate conventional oatmeal made from rolled oats when I was younger, but I never was fully converted to the texture, and after a while I decided I didn’t like it much.  Then I tried Scottish oats, and I fell in love with them.  I’ve had steel-cut too, which are nice, but I most definitely favor the texture of the coarse-ground groats when they’re cooked thoroughly.  I like to buy the groats whole and then run them through a hand-cranked auger grinder at a loose setting.

There’s something else I do: I add plenty of salt to them near the end of cooking, and I season them with herbs.  My standard recipe is a bit of ground rosemary and sage, and then maybe some pepper and butter in the bowl when I eat them.  Sometimes I’ll add nutmeg too, though I find I like that best with thyme.

Well, after getting the pellets started, I put the water on, in one of my outside pots.  It’s shallower than I like to use for porridge: I stir with a spurtle and I like to get it poked way down in.  But this was what I had.

woodgas stove 2015-08-26 porridge 1

The gas jets flickered faintly and fitfully: it was hard to get a picture of them.  Their insubstantial blue color seemed like a good sign, but they were destined to disappoint today.

In went the oats, and they simmered away happily for a while.

woodgas stove 2015-08-26 porridge 2

By the way, this was about three parts water to one part oatmeal: in this case 2 1/4 cups to 3/4.  While this was cooking I prepared the seasoning: a few rosemary leaves,

woodgas stove 2015-08-26 porridge 3 mortar

ground up with some salt

woodgas stove 2015-08-26 porridge 4 mortar

and a couple of sage leaves.

woodgas stove 2015-08-26 porridge 5 mortar

I took that out to where I thought my porridge was simmering, to find that the dang stove had gone out.  This has not happened when I’ve used other fuel, so I’m not sure what I should be doing different with the pellets.  I like the idea of using pellets.  I like being able to burn scavenged and salvaged chunks and sticks too, but pellets are so convenient and compact.  I like their smell, I like paying five dollars for a forty pound bag.  I wonder if I need more or bigger intake holes.

Somehow, Lucia stoves manage to burn for up to 6 hours on a load of pellets.  So it can’t be only a matter of the fuel being packed too tightly: those stoves are much larger than mine.

I’ll keep posting about my experiments with them.  Meanwhile, here’s what I did with my porridge.  I stirred in my seasoning

woodgas stove 2015-08-26 porridge 6 stir
(My spurtle is a wizard wand I bought from local artisans at a festival, so I can conjure a patronus with it if I need to.)

woodgas stove 2015-08-26 porridge 7 stir

and then I ate it.

People are often surprised when I tell them how I season my porridge: Americans aren’t used to having savory oatmeal.  I’ve been eating it this way for years and I won’t go back.  Try sage and rosemary in yours, it’s delicious.

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